Force And Motion Lab Homework

Course description

Force and Motion 5E Lesson Plans Bundle - Everything you need to teach a unit on Force and Motion. Each of the 7 lesson plans follows the 5E model and provides you with the exact tools to teach the topics. All of the guesswork has been removed with these NO PREP lessons.

Complete 5E Lessons Included for Each Topic:

-Newton's Laws
-Calculate Average Speed Using Distance and Time - calculate average speed from graphs and word problems. Also includes speed, velocity, and acceleration
-Work - determine work or not. Work = Force * Distance
-Unbalanced and Balanced Forces - compare and contrast unbalanced and balanced forces
-Net Force - calculate net force
-Motion Graphing - graph motion using position/time and distance/time graphs
-Simple Machines - demonstrate basic relationships between force and motion using simple machines

What’s Included in Each 5E Lesson:

Engagement:
Objective and I CAN statements – 11x17 for class display
Blank Objective and I CAN statements – Available for editing
Engagement Activity - Specific instructions for teacher for an engaging introduction

Exploration:
Differentiated Station Lab – Student-Led and Differentiated for all learning styles

Explanation:
Editable Interactive PowerPoint - No more boring notes
INB Templates – Templates for student interactive notebooks
Modified Notes
Anchor Chart Diagrams and Ideas

Elaboration:
Student Choice Project – completed in class or at home

Evaluation:
Vocabulary Crossword Puzzle (modified also included)
Homework – Weekly homework assignment
Assessment – Open-ended and modified assessment

Terms of Use
Copyright © Chris Kesler. All rights reserved by author. This product is to be used by the original downloader only. Copying for more than one teacher, classroom, department, school, or school system is prohibited. This product may not be distributed or displayed digitally for public view. Failure to comply is a copyright infringement and a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Clipart and elements found in this PDF are copyrighted and cannot be extracted and used outside of this file without permission or license. Intended for classroom and personal use ONLY.

Unformatted text preview: Lab 3: Force and motion Physics 193 Page 1 of 5 Lab 3: Force and motion II LEARNING GOALS OF THIS LAB: 1. Make a prediction based on a hypothesis, and perform an experiment to test this hypothesis. Understand the difference between a hypothesis and a prediction. 2. Represent a complex situation graphically by constructing a force diagram to show the forces exerted on an object. 3. Collect data from an experiment and find a pattern that will allow you to formulate a relationship. I. TESTING EXPERIMENT: NET FORCE AND MOTION Design an experiment to test the following hypothesis: An object always moves in the direction of the unbalanced force exerted on it by other objects. Available equipment: Dynamics cart, dynamics track, spring scale, masking tape, pulley, string, objects with different masses to hang, hanger, ramp, book. Since this is a testing experiment, download and have a look through the rubric for testing experiments from the course website. It’s rubric C. Getting ready for the first symposium: As you work through this experiment create a condensed version of your lab writeup on the whiteboard (you will hand in the full version along with the rest of your work). Include your prediction and experimental outcome. Be as neat and organized as you can since later on other groups will need to understand your work. Write the following: a) State the hypothesis you are going to test. b) Brainstorm the task and make a list of possible experiments whose outcomes can be predicted based on the hypothesis. Remember, testing a hypothesis requires that you design experiments to disprove the hypothesis. Decide which experiment you are going to perform. Explain why you chose the experiment that you have decided to perform. c) Draw a force diagram for the object during the time that the forces are being exerted on it. d) Use the hypothesis being tested to make a prediction about the outcome of the experiment. The prediction must follow from the hypothesis and could be very different from what you personally think will happen. e) Perform the experiment. Record the outcome. f) Was the outcome consistent with the prediction? g) Based on your prediction and the outcome of your experiment, can you say that the hypothesis is disproved, supported, or was your experiment inconclusive? h) Revise the hypothesis so that it is consistent with the outcomes of the experiments. Symposium Once your TA gives the signal, choose half of the table to get up and move around to the other tables. Their goal is to see what other groups have done and to get in discussions when what they did differs from what you did. The goal of the other half of the table (the half that stays behind) is to have discussions with people from the groups as they visit. Once you have visited the other tables and given/received help get back together with your group and discuss what you learned and make revisions to your work. Lab 3: Force and motion Physics 193 Page 2 of 5 II. OBSERVATION EXPERIMENT: INTERACTIONS BETWEEN DIFFERENT OBJECTS The goal of this experiment is to find a relationship between the force that an object A exerts on an object B and the force that the object B exerts on the object A when they are interacting with each other. Available Equipment: Force probes with bumpers on ends, computer with Logger Pro, string, hook attachments for the force probes Since this is an observation experiment, download and have a look through the rubric for observation experiments from the course website. It’s rubric B. Note on equipment: You will be using a new sensor called a force probe for this experiment. A force probe is a sensor that sends a signal to a computer indicating the force exerted on its tip. The software interface, Logger Pro, allows you to plot the force exerted on the force probe as a function of time. You can do this for two probes simultaneously. IMPORTANT: the force probes need to be “zeroed” before each time you use them. There’s a button next to the Collect” button for this. Setting up the force probes: First, connect the two force probes to the ports labeled “CH1” and “CH2”. Run Logger Pro. It will automatically detect the two force probes. Click “Collect” to start taking data. Gently pull or push on the bumper (it looks like a rubber band stretched between two plastic arms). Examine the graph on the screen and make sure it makes sense to you. Think of the force probe as the object in a force diagram. You exerted a force on this object, and this force was recorded as a function of time. Now that you are familiar with force probes, design and perform two experiments that investigate the forces that two interacting objects exert on each other. Look for a pattern that relates the two forces to each another. For example: Place one probe at rest on the table and tap it with the second probe. Remember that the probes are very delicate and if you use them to tap one another, you need to do it lightly. For each of your two experiments, include the following in your report: a) Describe the set-up in words and sketch or print the graphs that you see on the computer. b) Find a pattern in the pairs of graphs representing the force-versus-time functions recorded by each probe during the time the interaction is taking place. c) Devise a hypothesis about the relationship between the force that an object A exerts on an object B to the force that the object B exerts on the object A. III. TESTING EXPERIMENT: INTERACTION BETWEEN DIFFERENT OBJECTS The goal of this experiment is to test the hypothesis about the relationship between the force that an object A exerts on an object B to the force that the object B exerts on the object A. Rubrics you’re being scored on in this experiment: Available Equipment: Force probe sensors with bumpers on ends, dynamics track, dynamics carts, objects of different masses to put on carts, computer with Logger Pro. Rubrics attached at end of lab C1, C2, C4, C7, C8 Getting ready for the second symposium: As you work through this experiment create a condensed version of your lab writeup on the whiteboard (the full version will be in your lab writeup). Include the hypothesis you are testing, your predictions, and your experimental outcomes. Also include your discussions of the two situations listed below. Be as neat and organized as you can since later on other groups will need to understand your work. 1. Brainstorm with your group members and make a list of possible experiments whose outcome can be predicted based on the hypothesis. Choose the two experiments that are the most appropriate. Lab 3: Force and motion Physics 193 Page 3 of 5 2. Perform each of the two experiments, following the appropriate steps for a testing experiment. Use the rubrics at the end of this lab and the testing experiments you performed in previous labs to guide you. 3. Your writeup should include enough detail so that someone not present in lab would have a clear idea of your experiment and its results. Symposium Once your TA gives the signal, choose half of the table to get up and move around to the other tables. Their goal is to see what other groups have done and to get in discussions when what they did differs from what you did. The goal of the other half of the table (the half that stays behind) is to have discussions with people from the groups as they visit. Once you have visited the other tables and given/received help get back together with your group and discuss what you learned and make revisions to your work. According to the hypothesis you just devised and tested, which force is larger in these situations: a. A car is traveling down a highway just barely obeying the speed limit when a mosquito smashes into its windshield. The force the mosquito exerts on the windshield, or the force the windshield exerts on the mosquito. b. A doctor taps your knee with a Taylor hammer to examine your reflexes. The force the hammer exerts on your knee, or the force your knee exerts on the hammer. Many people who are not taking this course would object to your answers. Why do you think this is? What would you say to convince them? IV. BEFORE YOU LEAVE THE LAB PLEASE PERFORM THE FOLLOWING EXPERIMENT (YOU WILL NEED IT FOR THE HOMEWORK): Place an object on an electronic scale and record the reading. Next, keeping the object on the scale, tilt the scale about 100-200 and record the reading. That is all you have to do for now. You will need this data to complete the lab homework that is due next week. V. WHY DID WE DO THIS LAB? 1. Reflection question: Why was experiment 2 called an observational experiment and experiment 3 a testing experiment? What was the difference? 2. Explain the difference between a hypothesis and a prediction. 3. Write a brief paragraph describing when in your future work you might need to test a hypothesis by using it to predict the outcome of a new experiment. First choose a hypothesis, then use it to make a prediction of an outcome of a possible experiment, and then describe a possible outcome that will rule out the hypothesis. VI. HOMEWORK In the next lab you will need to solve a practical problem using two different methods. To decide whether two experiments give you the same result, you need to pay careful attention to assumptions and experimental uncertainties. Answering the questions below will help you be more successful. 1. Devise an explanation for what happened in part IV of the lab. Include force diagrams and keep in mind what the scale actually measures. 2. Imagine that you are measuring the mass of a piece of jewelry using an electronic platform scale. It has a smallest increment of 0.1g and you record a value of 250 g. Determine the relative uncertainty of your measurement. Lab 3: Force and motion Physics 193 Page 4 of 5 3. After recording the reading of the scale, you notice that the table on which the scale was sitting is tilted a little bit. You measure the angle of the tilt and find it to be about 10° . Is it reasonable to make the assumption assume that the table is not tilted? To answer this question, compare the change in the reading of the scale due to the tilt with the uncertainty in the scale measurement. 4. You want to measure the angle of the tilt carefully. You have a protractor and a ruler (same as in the homework for the first lab). Describe two different methods that you could use to measure the angle with the available equipment. 5. Suppose using each method yields a result of 10° . Estimate the uncertainty in each of these results. Which of them is more uncertain? Which method do you recommend using? RUBRICS RUBRIC C: Ability to design and conduct a testing experiment (testing an idea/hypothesis/explanation or mathematical relation) Scientific Ability C 1 C 2 C 4 Missing Inadequate Is able to identify the hypothesis to be tested No mention is made of a hypothesis. An attempt is made to identify the hypothesis to be tested but is described in a confusing manner. Is able to design a reliable experiment that tests the hypothesis The experiment does not test the hypothesis. The experiment tests the hypothesis, but due to the nature of the design it is likely the data will lead to an incorrect judgment. Is able to make a reasonable prediction based on a hypothesis No prediction is made. The experiment is not treated as a testing experiment. Needs some improvement The hypothesis to be tested is described but there are minor omissions or vague details. The experiment tests the hypothesis, but due to the nature of the design there is a moderate chance the data will lead to an inconclusive judgment. A prediction is made but Prediction follows from it is identical to the hypothesis but is flawed hypothesis, OR because Prediction is made based * relevant experimental on a source unrelated to assumptions are not hypothesis being tested, considered and/or or is completely * prediction is inconsistent with incomplete or somewhat hypothesis being tested, inconsistent with OR Prediction is hypothesis and/or unrelated to the context * prediction is of the designed somewhat inconsistent experiment. with the experiment. Adequate The hypothesis is clearly stated. The experiment tests the hypothesis and has a high likelihood of producing data that will lead to a conclusive judgment. A prediction is made that * follows from hypothesis, * is distinct from the hypothesis, * accurately describes the expected outcome of the designed experiment, * incorporates relevant assumptions if needed. Lab 3: Force and motion Physics 193 Page 5 of 5 C 7 Is able to decide whether the prediction and the outcome agree/disagre e No mention of whether the prediction and outcome agree/disagree . A decision about the agreement/disagreemen t is made but is not consistent with the outcome of the experiment. A reasonable decision about the agreement/disagreemen t is made but experimental uncertainty is not taken into account. A reasonable decision about the agreement/disagreemen t is made and experimental uncertainty is taken into account. C 8 Is able to make a reasonable judgment about the hypothesis No judgment is made about the hypothesis. A judgment is made but is not consistent with the outcome of the experiment. A judgment is made, is consistent with the outcome of the experiment, but assumptions are not taken into account. A judgment is made, consistent with the experimental outcome, and assumptions are taken into account. ...
View Full Document

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *